Diabetes Reversal

Diabetes testing kit with needles and medicine for diabetics

DIABETES - GETTING BACK THE SWEETNESS IN YOUR LIFE

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a modern epidemic, with an increase of 400% in the past 30 years.  Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar) or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin that is produced. This leads to high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycaemia – a dangerous condition that can damage especially the blood vessels and nerves. This form of diabetes is caused mainly as a result of excess body weight, inactivity and emotional stress.

Symptoms like fatigue, irritability, slow healing sores, yeast infections and blurry vision are enough to suck the sweetness from your life.  

The good news is, that since type 2 diabetes is caused by lifestyle issues, it can be prevented or reversed by making lifestyle changes.  Here are the ten most effective steps you can take to get started:

  1. The most overlooked factor in reversing and preventing diabetes is stress – both emotional and environmental. Family problems, work issues and especially sleep disturbance.  Our bodies are governed by the biological clock or circadian rhythm that functions according light and darkness cycles. Just 10 days of significant disturbance of the circadian rhythm in diabetes-prone rodents led to an impairment of the functioning of the pancreas.  Lack of sleep, travelling and shift work could have a significant impact on your body’s ability to regulate insulin production.
  2. Removing sugar from the diet is the first logical step in dealing with diabetes nutritionally. This includes simple carbohydrates like potatoes, grains and even fruit (with the exception of half a cup of berries a day).
  3. Exercise. George Griffing, professor of endocrinology at the Saint Louis University School of medicine recommends at least 30 minutes of exercise each day.  It is really useful to get a pedometer and set a goal of at least 10 000 steps per day.  Alternatively, type 2 diabetics have had very positive results with high intensity interval training – 40 seconds of intense exercise followed by 20 seconds of complete rest repeated multiple times.
  4. Drink at least 6-8 eight fluid ounces of water a day.  A French study reports that those who drink a minimum of 34 ounces of water per day had were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) than those who drank half that amount.  A high fibre diet also necessitates a higher water intake as fibre absorbs water.
  5. Avoid foods that disrupt intestinal health, causing inflammation and immune reactions.  Most notable in this category, are unsprouted grains, gluten, and hydrogenated oils such as soybean, cottonseed and canola oils.  
  6. Adding healthy fats, protein and fibre to the diet to balance blood sugar and slow down the absorption of glucose is an important step.  Green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables (especially broccoli), coconut oil, seeds (especially flax and chia), nuts, avocados and olives.
  7. Avoid coffee and alcohol.  Most coffees are highly processed and sprayed with pesticides, and alcohol breaks down into glucose.
  8. Remove dairy from your diet. Most of the conventional milk sold contains A1 beta-casein which triggers an allergic reaction which leads to a disruption of the hormones leptin and cortisol which causes huge increases in blood sugar levels.
  9. Ingest herbs and spices that support the body’s blood sugar levels, including turmeric, parsley and cinnamon (even using cinnamon essential oil mixed into your body lotion will have a positive impact).
  10. Supplements that are effective in lowering and maintaining normal blood sugar levels include chromium, alpha lipoic acid (ALA) and milk thistle that supports glutathione levels that encourage liver detoxification.  

Hand reaching for a donut temptation leads to diabetes.

How it Starts.

Our energy comes from the food we eat and the things we drink.  We eat for many reasons other than to get energy.   Eating is more often a habit or a result of depression than a real physical need.

Energy is then absorbed into the bloodstream.  The blood being the carrier in the body carry nutrients to the pancreas. The pancreas  responds by releasing a hormone called insulin in different amounts.   This is a signal to let the tissues know that the energy is coming. Each of the cells in the body responds to that insulin according to its individual set of needs.

The more energy is needed the more sensitive to the insulin hormone the tissue becomes.  This wonderful yet simple design gets the right amount of energy to the correct parts of the body.  When all is in balance all is well.

Balance is a beautiful thing and when the body works optimally athletes do better,  adults work harder and life is good in general.  However, if there is more energy than the tissues need, the individual cells begin to develop resistance to insulin. As more and more cells develop insulin resistance it becomes apparent that the body has insulin resistance.

This insulin resistance leads to an increase in the level of insulin in the blood and a negative cycle begins.  The body tries to keep the sugar levels down but humans keep on feeding it more and more.  The body seems to “understand” that too much sugar in the blood leads to problems in small blood vessels, but the human who runs the food intake has another agenda, eating more.

Diabetes: The Cause

Diabetes is an epidemic, with an increase of 400% in the past 30 years.  Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar) or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin that is produced.

This leads to high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycaemia – a dangerous condition that can damage especially the blood vessels and nerves. This form of diabetes is caused mainly as a result of a combination of  diet, excess body weight, inactivity and emotional stress.

Symptoms like fatigue, irritability, slow healing sores, yeast infections and blurry vision occurs, and sends us down a slippery slope.   It is usually at this point when most people reach out for help.

The good news is, that since type 2 diabetes is caused by lifestyle issues.   It can be prevented or reversed by making lifestyle changes.

The Epidemiology of Diabetes

About 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, and many more are pre-diabetic.  In fact 1 in 3 adults in America are pre-diabetic. In fact it is so widespread that most people think of it as a illness that is not really damaging.  Few realize that having diabetes increases your risk of death by 50%.  The estimate is that it costs American $245 Billion  dollars a year.  This is staggering if you realize that all this can be avoided or at least reversed.

The American Diabetes Association state the following: “Diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, with 69,071 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death, and a total of 234,051 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause .

 Jelly teddy surrounded by colorful candy

 

Diabetes Diet

Eliminating sugar from our diet is the first logical step in dealing with diabetes from a diet point of view.  This includes simple carbohydrates like potatoes, rice and corn and even fruit.   If you enjoy fruit then a cup of berries a day is highly recommended.

Avoiding  foods that disrupt intestinal health and that cause inflammation and immune reactions is essential.  Most notable in this category, are unsprouted grains, gluten, casein (found in cows milk) and hydrogenated oils such as soybean, cottonseed and canola oils.

Adding healthy fats, protein and fiber to the diet to balance blood sugars works well to slow down the absorption of glucose.  Green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables (of which broccoli is the king), coconut oil, seeds such as  flaxseed  and chia), nuts, avocados and olives.

Avoid coffee and alcohol.  Most coffees are highly processed and sprayed with pesticides, and alcohol breaks down into glucose.

Let me mind shape a meal for you. Ideally, your meals are going to be high in three things: protein, fiber and healthy fats. So protein foods like wild salmon and free-range eggs, high-fiber foods like split peas and figs, and healthy fats like coconut oil and MCT oil are going to help balance out those blood sugar levels.

So include lots of protein in your new diabetic diet plan. After wild-caught salmon, go for grass-fed beef, organic chicken and turkey, and don’t forget eggs. Eggs are back on the menu now that researches have found that we need them for a healthy heart.  Big news and big turnaround on that one

For our vegetarians and vegans well you know that lentils and chickpeas are tasty and wonderful sources of protein.  Fiber-rich foods are even more important, including artichokes, green leafy vegetables, celery, nuts and seeds (like chia seeds, flaxseeds, pumpkin seeds, almonds, walnuts, celery. A high-fiber diet will support detoxification and healthy blood sugar levels.

Also, start using coconut oil, which is great for burning fat. Coconut oil benefits blood glucose levels, too. Start cooking with coconut oil and using coconut milk or coconut oil in a morning superfood shake. Coconut oil, ghee or grass-fed butter all work for balancing out blood sugar levels. A good diabetic diet plan include those healthy fatty acids.

 So remember to go big on protein, fiber and healthy fats during all of your meals.  The ideal is to go for kings breakfast and queens lunch and a poor mans dinner.  Notice snacks were not included in this plan, yes forget about snacks, if you can.

.